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May 24, 2017

3 Takeaways from the Healthcare Marketing and Physician Strategy Summit

By: Zargham Ghani

We recently came back from exhibiting at another great Healthcare Marketing and Physician Strategy Summit in Austin, TX. We spoke with a lot of engaged marketers and had the chance to hear Spartanburg Regional Health System and our own Andrew Rainey present on “Impacting the Patient Experience with Online Feedback.” For those who missed the…

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We recently came back from exhibiting at another great Healthcare Marketing and Physician Strategy Summit in Austin, TX. We spoke with a lot of engaged marketers and had the chance to hear Spartanburg Regional Health System and our own Andrew Rainey present on “Impacting the Patient Experience with Online Feedback.” For those who missed the event, we wanted to share a few takeaways and observations.

Marketing’s Goal: Holistic Reputation Management

Taking a complete approach to reputation management is on attendees’ marketing roadmap – if they’re not already there. We’ve seen many starting off with the basics of review monitoring and listings and gradually moving up the reputation management stack to implement a complete marketing/patient experience strategy that includes engaging healthcare consumers, analyzing patient experience data, taking a 360-degree approach to listings management, and adopting transparency. As one attendee said, each step we take gets us closer to the goal line. What’s going to help them get there? According to attendees, it’s simple: showing results along the way.

Online Reputation Impacts Patient Experience – and Vice Versa

Everyone we spoke to understands the end goal: the patient experience and marketing coming together. In fact, the direct correlation between HCAHPS scores and social media scores was a topic we were hearing. Marketers see this as an indicator that validates the value of online reviews. In a recent study we did, we discovered a correlation that demonstrated just that. The study of 105 hospitals across 19 states discovered a strong, positive correlation (0.54 coefficient) between patient feedback scores calculated from unstructured online reviews and HCAHPS Top Box scores (overall rating domain).

Transparency and ROI
Everyone gets that patients are consumers – and transparency matters to them. They’re very cautious when implementing features, and are looking at ROI extensively to prove this is worthwhile. This is when relating star ratings to appointment scheduling and gaining new patients becomes a vital metric. Those who are doing it are finding the ROI to be significant.

About the Author

Zargham Ghani
Engagement Manager

Zargham help healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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May 19, 2017

Physician and Patient Opinions on Online Physician Rating and Reviews Websites

By: Sabrina Egan

What do patients and physicians really think about online reviews and ratings of physicians and healthcare practices? The Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM) decided to find out. JGIM’s recent report, Physician and Patient Views on Public Physician Rating Websites: A Cross-Sectional Study, surveyed 828 physicians affiliated with one of four hospitals in large healthcare…

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What do patients and physicians really think about online reviews and ratings of physicians and healthcare practices? The Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM) decided to find out.

JGIM’s recent report, Physician and Patient Views on Public Physician Rating Websites: A Cross-Sectional Study, surveyed 828 physicians affiliated with one of four hospitals in large healthcare organizations across eastern Massachusetts, as well as 494 adult patients who received care in the system throughout May 2015.

Some highlights of the study include:

  • Physicians reported higher levels of agreement with the accuracy of numerical data (53 percent) and narrative comments (62 percent) from health system patient experience surveys, while only 36 percent agreed to the accuracy on independent online rating and review sites.
  • On the other hand, 57 percent of patients reported trusting the accuracy of data obtained from independent websites more than health system patient experience data.
  • Overwhelmingly, 78 percent of physicians believed that comments published online would increase their job stress, and some even believed this could have a negative effect on the physician-patient relationship.
  • However, 51 percent of patients supported posting comments online and visible to the public, compared to 21 percent of physicians.

All in all, physicians and patients have differing views on whether third-party rating and review sites or patient experience survey data published on health system websites are the more reliable source of information—or even if such data should be shared publicly at all. Physicians are certainly concerned about the impact negative online ratings and reviews can have, however patients feel that such information empowers them to make better informed health‐related choices.

While healthcare practices may be hesitant to implement a transparency initiative in their organization, digital consumerism continues to disrupt healthcare, moving patient experience beyond care alone. Online reviews are increasing and consumers are more frequently heading online to make their healthcare choices. Because of this, healthcare systems that don’t adopt a consumer-driven mindset are likely to fall behind on loyalty and acquisition of new patients.  Transparency and patient engagement are essential for healthcare organizations that want to better understand consumer challenges and needs, and improve patient experience.

About the Author

Sabrina Egan
Engagement Manager

Sabrina helps healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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May 10, 2017

Webinar Review: Key Strategies for Adopting Transparency and Increasing Consumer Engagement

By: John McFeely

In case you missed it, Greystone.net – creators of the Healthcare Internet Conference – hosted a webinar, Key Strategies for Adopting Transparency and Increasing Health Consumer Engagement. Guest presenters offered advice for healthcare organizations looking to become a more trusted voice in the physician select process and provided recommended practices on implementing and managing a…

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In case you missed it, Greystone.net – creators of the Healthcare Internet Conference – hosted a webinar, Key Strategies for Adopting Transparency and Increasing Health Consumer Engagement. Guest presenters offered advice for healthcare organizations looking to become a more trusted voice in the physician select process and provided recommended practices on implementing and managing a successful transparency initiative. We heard from Kasey Duffy, Regional Marketing Director and Blake Long, Marketing Manager from UnityPoint Health, along with EVP of Strategy at Binary Fountain, Andrew Rainey, and Anne Stern, Press Ganey’s Vice President of Strategic & Product Marketing. Here were some of the key takeaways:

UnityPoint Health, one of the nation’s most integrated health systems, underwent a transparency initiative with the objectives of improving the consumer and patient experience.

During the webinar, UnityPoint Health emphasized aligning your transparency initiative with overall business strategy. Taking this approach, UnityPoint Health created measurable goals to help them define success – and work toward achieving. Since launching the program, UnityPoint Health has seen physician communications scores increase. They’ve also seen prospective patients spending 50% more time on provider profile pages, while providers with reviews are now receiving nearly 75% of their online appointment requests.

Generating Organization-wide Support and Buy-in

According to Binary Fountain’s latest eBook, The Essential Guide to Transparency and one of its co-authors, Andrew Rainey, gaining physician buy-in is a top priority for many healthcare organizations. Having an executive or physician sponsor champion the initiative can ensure everyone in the practice is on the same page. In fact, Blake and Kasey stressed the importance of this. For UnityPoint Health, their physician champion was the face of the program to their physicians and also provided guidance and support throughout.

More essential steps to transparency initiative buy-in include:

  • Defining how transparency works and its value.
  • Sharing case studies and best practices.
  • Sharing survey scores and feedback.
  • Implementing an internal soft launch.

However, getting buy-in is just the beginning. Transparency is an ongoing process and while someone from the marketing or the patient experience department typically drives the initiative, it requires a team of dedicated professionals to keep the ball rolling.

All in all, healthcare organizations need to prioritize transforming their physician directory pages into an engaging experience that informs and guides consumer decision making. Healthcare practices must ensure ratings are objective, standardized and trustworthy evaluations of the patient experience in order to build patient acquisition and loyalty.

To learn more, listen to the recorded version of this webinar or read our in-depth interview with UnityPoint Health here.

About the Author

John McFeely
Sales Director

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May 05, 2017

Engaging with Patient Online Reviews and Surveys to Improve Reputation Management

By: Sabrina Egan

As consumers increasingly look to the web to make their healthcare choices, it’s critical that practices pay attention to what patients are saying about them online. We spoke with Kim Mott, Physician Liaison from Florida Orthopaedic Institute, about her organization’s recent push to analyze and act on online patient reviews and survey responses. Hi Kim, can…

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Florida Orthopaedic Institute

As consumers increasingly look to the web to make their healthcare choices, it’s critical that practices pay attention to what patients are saying about them online. We spoke with Kim Mott, Physician Liaison from Florida Orthopaedic Institute, about her organization’s recent push to analyze and act on online patient reviews and survey responses.

Hi Kim, can you give us a little background on what drove the need for this initiative around reputation management? 

We know that our current and prospective patients are frequently spending time online researching healthcare providers and we’ve seen a lot of reviews about our practice and physicians on third-party rating and review sites. We have a sizeable practice with 40 physicians and 10 locations, so managing these reviews became a priority. We value being patient focused and our online reputation should reflect the experience we deliver. Also, our physicians were having concerns – and a bit of anxiety – about negative reviews. We’ve even had doctors walk into our office asking if we could take down a negative review.

We realized digital marketing was coming into play and we needed a way, as I mentioned, to manage our online reputation. We also needed to update our website and create one space for patients to share their positive stories.

What steps did you take to address those needs and get this initiative going? And how did you handle any challenges you ran into along the way?

Our Marketing Director went to upper management and explained that we really needed an effective way to manage our reputation and create a better experience for our patients. We’re both from hospitality backgrounds and know that listening to our customers and providing 5-star service is important. They agreed and allowed our team to start researching solutions that could help us monitor and respond to feedback from digital patient surveys, social media and online rating and review sites. Doing this all in one platform was important. This is when we discovered Binary Fountain.

We also began making physicians and managers aware of the new processes and explained that it was a means to improve reputation and the overall patient experience. This was one of the biggest challenges of the program. We had to overcome that initial hesitation from physicians. However, they were much more favorable to it once they understood why we wanted to hear from patients. We told them we couldn’t take down negatives reviews from third-party sites, so they were eager to increase positive reviews online.

We really wanted to hear from our patients and generate more feedback from them. Surveys, like I mentioned, was one way to do this. Previously we had been asking patients to fill out paper surveys to discuss their experience, which was a very manual, time-consuming method and patients were not very elaborate in their comments. So, we worked with Binary Fountain to switch to an online survey process and implement email campaigns using their platform. We also created an awareness campaign for the surveys. We handed out brochures to patients informing them they’d receive an online survey by email after their visit asking them to rate their experience. We asked physicians and office staff to encourage patients to complete them.

Being responsive to our patients’ concerns was also important. Binary Health Analytics was really helpful here. If we received a negative survey score or comment stemming from a specific practice, we could dynamically assign the appropriate person from that office to follow up with the patient. And follow up needs to happen within 24 hours or the issue automatically gets escalated. When it was an online review, I would initially handle it and work with the appropriate person or customer service to quickly resolve the issue.

This level of responsiveness lets patients know that we really care about their experience with us and that we want to make improvements wherever possible. Customers were pleasantly surprised when we followed up with them. They love that we listen to them. For our online presence, we believe that the increased volume of online reviews we’ve received since the beginning of this program is attributed to engaging our patients. We’ve also seen several negative online posts removed after we reached out to them.

How is this initiative impacting the organization?

Due to this initiative, we’ve seen a significant increase in positive online reviews and completed patient surveys. Overall patient feedback scores have also increased.

We strive to create a great overall experience. Binary Fountain has given us an opportunity to share positive feedback and encourage staff members to enhance their performance. It’s making a huge impact on employee morale which affects patient experience. The insights gathered from the comments have also given us a way to coach and train our staff in areas needing improvement.

And finally, what has Binary Fountain’s technology platform helped you do?

Binary Fountain’s platform has allowed us to accumulate and act all of our patient voices into one dashboard. This is something that was desperately needed in our large practice and is certainly needed in healthcare.

We know more and more patients are heading online to read reviews and select their healthcare providers and we needed a way to give them answers. Binary Fountain has helped us streamline communication with our patients and show them we value their feedback. We want to let consumers know we’re listening, we care and we want them to choose us.

About the Author

Sabrina Egan
Engagement Manager

Sabrina helps healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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April 20, 2017

Empowering Consumer and Patient Experience with Transparency

By: Zargham Ghani

  With the increasing importance of online reviews in the provider selection process, healthcare systems are adapting their digital strategies to improve consumer and patient experience. One of the nation’s most integrated health systems, UnityPoint Health, has been doing just that. They’ve been publishing star ratings and comments from their Press Ganey survey data to…

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With the increasing importance of online reviews in the provider selection process, healthcare systems are adapting their digital strategies to improve consumer and patient experience. One of the nation’s most integrated health systems, UnityPoint Health, has been doing just that. They’ve been publishing star ratings and comments from their Press Ganey survey data to provider profile pages for over a year now. We spoke to UnityPoint Health’s Kasey Duffy, Regional Marketing Director, and Blake Long, Marketing Manager, about this transparency initiative and marketing’s role in driving it.

Can you give us a little background on what drove the need for this initiative around transparency? 

Kasey: Fortunately for us, upper management was committed to finding innovative ways to improve patient experience. We saw transparency as a way for providers to take a leadership role in our clinics and shape positive patient experiences.

We also wanted to focus on the consumer experience. We knew we wanted to make choosing a provider as easy as possible for healthcare consumers, and wanted to give them a clear picture of their options by presenting them with detailed feedback from previous patients. That’s where publishing star ratings and comments to provider profile pages came in.

What steps did you take to address those needs and get the initiative going?

Blake: We actually began making preparations for the initiative well in advance. We wanted to make sure that providers were ready and equipped with every tool available to them to lead the way in patient experience. We started by explaining how the program worked, why it was a necessary step to empower consumers in making better healthcare choices and how it would help physicians take control of their online reputation.

Although the initiative was driven by marketing, we thought it would be better for physicians to hear about the program from one of their peers. We spent a lot of time with our provider sponsor, going through all of the ins and outs of the initiative. She gave us great insights into what providers would be concerned about and the best way to educate others on the program. I would definitely recommend this approach to other practices as well. In the end, we were able to gain physician buy-in, which has been key to this initiative’s success.

What challenges did you face along the way? How did you address them?

Kasey: Our biggest challenge was developing an appeals process for patient comments. What would we do if a comment was published and the provider wanted it to be deleted? Should we make a rule that everything gets published good or bad—no exceptions? This was challenging because everyone had a different idea of how the process should work.

Ultimately, we implemented a notification system allowing providers to review all their patient feedback before it is published online and to come forward with any matters of concern within 30 days. We also decided that if a provider wanted a patient comment removed from the website, they would need to fill out a special online form and state their case.

Creating the appeals process was a big challenge, however we have yet to use the process as there has never been an appeals request. I believe this can be attributed to the upfront effort we’ve made in working with physicians and their concerted effort toward delivering a great patient experience.

How is this initiative impacting the organization?

Blake: We believe we’ve helped empower healthcare consumers seek out the best provider for their needs and empowered providers to improve the patient experience. And we’re seeing results. Prospective patients are now spending 50% more time on our provider profile pages and providers with reviews are receiving nearly 75% of all online appointment requests.

Patient experience scores are on the upswing as well. When looking at the data, we’ve seen our physician communications score improve from 92.1% to 95.2 % from the beginning of the initiative through the end of 2016. This has given us an opportunity to take a step forward as an organization, leading the way in patient experience—and our patients have noticed.

Additionally, the initiative has helped us solidify where we want to be in the healthcare marketplace as a medical group with a large network of primary providers and specialists. We want to be the easiest health system to access—and we believe we are accomplishing that.

And finally, what has Binary Fountain’s technology platform helped you do?

Blake: We needed a platform and company aligned with our goals of improving healthcare consumer and patient experience.  Binary Fountain’s focus on healthcare, Press Ganey partnership, and deep experience with transparency and reputation management made them a logical choice. Their Binary Star Ratings solution has helped us effectively manage reviewing and publishing star ratings and comments.

Register now for the upcoming webinar on April 27th, featuring executive guest speakers from UnityPoint Health, Press Ganey, Binary Fountain and more. You’ll hear strategies and advice for helping your practice become a more trusted voice for your patients as well as steps for adopting and managing a successful transparency initiative of your own.

About the Author

Zargham Ghani
Engagement Manager

Zargham help healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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April 18, 2017

Building Patient Loyalty and Understanding the “Why” Behind a Star Rating

By: Andrew Rainey

Online Feedback and Trust Summer’s around the corner and many of us are planning summer vacations. We’re doing online research to help make decisions about where to stay, new beach essentials, activities for the family, and which new restaurants to try out. We’re coming to trust this information, often as much as a recommendation from…

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Online Feedback and Trust

Summer’s around the corner and many of us are planning summer vacations. We’re doing online research to help make decisions about where to stay, new beach essentials, activities for the family, and which new restaurants to try out. We’re coming to trust this information, often as much as a recommendation from a friend or family member. Peer reviews and 5-star ratings have a meaningful and significant impact in our day to day decisions, and healthcare consumers are no different. It’s critical that you pay attention to what patients are saying about you, no matter where they say it.

If you’re a healthcare marketing professional, you may have an abundance of CAHPS survey data at your fingertips. Combine that with email survey campaigns, online ratings and reviews, and social media comments, and your patient experience picture begins to grow and become more detailed. When it comes to ratings and reviews on third-party sites like Healthgrades, Facebook, Yelp and Google, it’s important to assume that an overwhelming majority of the feedback is genuine. Of course, not all patient comments will cover every aspect of their doctor’s visit or hospital stay, but it will reflect meaningful moments of their perceived experience.

The truth is that most credible third-party sites invest time verifying the integrity of their ratings and reviews; after all, their own reputation is on the line (think of Amazon’s “Verified Purchase” tag). So, if you come across a less-than-stellar review, imagine that patient who posted it standing in front of you. What would you say to them? Proactively addressing their experience can go a long way toward winning back that patient’s trust and loyalty, not to mention the countless potential patients reading that online review. Remember: creating a better patient experience leads to a better online reputation.

Patient Experience is Everyone’s Business

Within the health systems and practices that we interact with every day at Binary Fountain, the roles and responsibilities around “patient experience” are rapidly evolving. Multiple departments now have a distinct impact on patient experiences, with marketing now playing an integral role. Why? Patient interactions with their providers are no longer just at the point of care—they’ve gone digital and the patient experience starts well before they step foot in your office or hospital. With keen insights into timely online patient feedback from ratings and review sites, social media, surveys and more, marketing is quickly becoming a key collaborator in the patient experience discussion.

Traditionally, a patients’ experience with the nurse or doctor solely drove the patient experience. Today, however, that’s expanded to include more experience “touchpoints”, including digital. Is it easy for a patient to find you, and is the information they discover online accurate? If a patient has a complaint, will someone promptly follow up with him or her? As I said before, every moment is meaningful, and patient experience and marketing teams can work hand in hand to create a positive experience throughout the patient’s journey.

Making Sense of Star Ratings and Reviews

It’s easy to see that five stars are better than two or three stars, but what really qualifies a five-star rating? How do you make sense of open-ended comments and feedback? Going back to my Amazon reference, think about a typical purchasing experience. When you’re making a decision to buy a new product, you want to see more than just an average rating, right? You want to read comments from real people who have already purchased and used this product, both positive and negative. Did it live up to expectations? Did it provide lasting value? Would you purchase it again?

Experiential data helps put into context why someone gave that product a three-, four- or five-star rating. That’s why it’s important to understand the operational patient experience factors that are working well—bedside manner and communication, for instance—as well as those that require prompt service recovery—front desk staff or wait time, for instance.

With online feedback continuing to grow, we need to move forward with addressing these challenges to create a better patient experience and online reputation. How are you analyzing online patient feedback? Are marketing and patient experience working together? Email me with your thoughts.

About the Author

Andrew Rainey
EVP of Strategy & Corporate Development

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April 13, 2017

Announcing Our Latest eBook: The Essential Guide to Transparency

By: John McFeely

Healthcare organizations are responding to their consumers’ need for accurate, “transparent” physician reviews by publishing verified ratings and comments from patient experience surveys to their physician profile pages. To help organizations looking to adopt transparency, we’ve created The Essential Guide to Transparency. The eBook outlines how to prepare for the initiative, best practices to follow,…

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Healthcare organizations are responding to their consumers’ need for accurate, “transparent” physician reviews by publishing verified ratings and comments from patient experience surveys to their physician profile pages.

To help organizations looking to adopt transparency, we’ve created The Essential Guide to Transparency. The eBook outlines how to prepare for the initiative, best practices to follow, insights from Press Ganey on verified patient experience survey data, and “from the battlefield” advice on vital factors like getting physician buy-in.

The e-Book addresses processes and challenges every transparency initiative faces. To begin, there are preparations that organizations should consider before implementing a transparency solution, such as developing an internal review committee and streamlining the review process for publishing patient comments. We even provide an assessment to help you evaluate how ready you are for a transparency initiative.

With healthcare organizations looking to increase consumer engagement, set themselves apart from competitors and better position their online reviews against third-party review sites, this eBook will give you the knowledge and tools to kick-start your transparency initiative – and do it right.

You can download the complimentary eBook here.

About the Author

John McFeely
Sales Director

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April 04, 2017

Reputation Management Best Practices – Patient Survey Success and Pitfalls to Avoid

By: Brian Williams

The need for reputation management is steadily growing as consumers head online to read and write reviews on patient experiences. As healthcare organizations look at different ways to improve patient care, it is vitally important for them to understand both patient experience and employee engagement. Enter digital patient surveys. We recently spoke with Kait Phillips…

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The need for reputation management is steadily growing as consumers head online to read and write reviews on patient experiences. As healthcare organizations look at different ways to improve patient care, it is vitally important for them to understand both patient experience and employee engagement. Enter digital patient surveys.

We recently spoke with Kait Phillips and Aksana Koch from Binary Fountain’s customer success team, who’ve been guiding clients through implementing and managing our reputation management solution, Binary Health Analytics. Here, they share their best practices for healthcare organizations adopting digital patient surveys as part of their reputation management strategy.

Hi Kait and Aksana. With so many online reviews and ratings available, could you please give us a little insight into why healthcare practices use surveys?

Kait: Surveys can give practices a different perspective. They offer more control with the kind of feedback you’re seeking from patients. Structured questions can evaluate specific patient experience criteria, like physician communications. You can also get feedback from open-ended questions, which can reveal valuable information.

Do you find that clients are using surveys at all? To what extent? What successes are you seeing happen and why?

Kait: Yes, clients are using surveys a lot and they’re really happy with the volume of feedback they’re getting. By asking patients for their feedback after a visit, practices often receive many more surveys than online reviews. They are also very successful at getting responses, typically with a 15-20% response rate.

Fairfax Radiology Consultants (FRC), for instance, has seen very positive results with surveys to help improve reputation and patient experience at their 17 outpatient imaging facilities. They are very focused on improving wait times, so they customize their surveys related to that issue. By doing so, they’ve achieved a 24% response rate, receiving 3,200 surveys per month. They use the insights gathered as part of their effort to achieve patient experience excellence.

Aksana: We’ve also seen great success when there is a raffle as part of an email campaign. New survey responders are entered monthly. This often increases response rates considerably.

What best practices can you share on surveys and email campaigns?

Kait: The most popular way to get surveys to patients is through email campaigns. Another option is to use a tablet or desktop computer at the front desk to offer point-of-care surveys to patients in the office.

Email surveys are sent at varying times, from daily to weekly. If we integrate with the client’s system, emails can be sent out daily, which is ideal because it usually increases the response rate, helping the practice consistently receive a sizeable amount of feedback.

Aksana: It’s also best practice to keep responses on the shorter side and focused on particular areas of concern. Our clients typically receive more responses if the survey doesn’t take too much time to complete.

We always recommend including unstructured comment sections in your surveys. While structured questions allow you to know if the patient had a good or bad experience, you won’t really know the reasoning behind their feedback and this can make all the difference in improving your organization’s reputation.

Are there any survey best practices for the organization itself?

Kait: Once patient surveys are in the system, it’s best to share the data at each staff meeting and focus on the positive feedback. Certainly mention any general areas of concern, but if there is negative feedback pertaining to a particular staff member, be sure to speak with them one-on-one in a private area.

Aksana: Staff engagement can certainly affect the patient experience. Many of our clients like to integrate monthly or quarterly awards for employees who receive the most positive feedback, such as a team lunch. This motivates staff to grasp the importance of the patient experience, the importance of following the best practices of their organization and emailing surveys to patients on a regular basis.

In terms of the tablet surveys, staff members need to make it a part of a structured, daily process to encourage patients to fill out a survey at the end of their visit.

What are the benefits of surveys through email campaigns and tablets?

Kait: Patients are more likely to fill out the open-ended feedback questions in email campaigns than when using tablet surveys in the office. We’ve seen several organizations post positive comments from those open-ended questions onto their physician pages as well.

Aksana: The benefit of the tablet survey method is the ability to focus on immediate service recovery. This allows you to receive patient responses before they have even left the practice. Alerts are sent to the practice administrator as soon as the survey is completed and if someone has had a negative experience, they can work to correct it right away and turn a negative experience into a positive one. With email surveys, you still can perform timely service recovery – particularly if you’re doing them daily. It just won’t be immediate.

What are promoter campaigns? How do they tie into surveys?

Kait: Promoter campaigns are great for organizations that really want to increase their online presence. They allow practices to send an email to patients with a one-question survey to rate their visit on a 10-point scale. If they rate their experience between a 9 or 10, they will be prompted to post an online review, typically on a third-party rating and review site. However, if they choose between a 0 or 8, they will be directed to additional survey questions so that the practice can receive more feedback to better understand what needs improvement.

How does Binary Fountain’s Natural Language Processing engine (NLP) help to organize all of the feedback clients receive?

Kait: The NLP will analyze any of the unstructured comments on surveys. It will break them down into different insights and assign the category and sentiment. Both negative and positive feedback is analyzed to help discover the practices’ strengths and weaknesses.

Finally, what pitfalls should organizations be sure to avoid when implementing digital surveys?

Kait: Having surveys with too many questions is a common pitfall we’ve seen. Surveys need to be concise, and not overly time-consuming in order to receive the greatest amount of feedback. Not uploading surveys regularly is another pitfall. They should be uploaded every week if not more frequently.

When using tablets, be sure the front desk staff members are asking patients to fill out your surveys. If they neglect to do this, you’re not very likely to get much feedback.

Aksana: In addition, within the Binary Fountain system, you can exclude certain patients from receiving repeat emails and preventing survey exhaustion for patients who frequently visit your practice.

No matter your distribution choice, digital surveys help organizations identify areas for improvement, can increase employee engagement and discover ways to enhance the patient experience.

Binary Fountain’s Binary Health Analytics platform makes your patient feedback powerful. By identifying patient insights from online reviews and surveys, organizations can uncover actionable insights unlocking the keys to productivity and performance and ultimately impacting patient experience.

If you have any questions for Kait and Aksana, please send them to marketing@binaryfountain.com.

About the Author

Brian Williams
Engagement Manager

Brian helps healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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March 30, 2017

It’s National Doctor’s Day!

By: Sabrina Egan

National Doctor’s Day is here! Since 1933, each year on March 30th Americans celebrate the integral role physicians serve, and recognize their contributions to individual lives and communities. Healthcare organizations are celebrating everywhere. Privia Health celebrated in its “Happy National Doctor’s Day” blog post by including great patient reviews. UnityPoint Health embraced the national holiday by encouraging patients to send…

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National Doctor’s Day is here! Since 1933, each year on March 30th Americans celebrate the integral role physicians serve, and recognize their contributions to individual lives and communities.

Healthcare organizations are celebrating everywhere. Privia Health celebrated in its “Happy National Doctor’s Day” blog post by including great patient reviews. UnityPoint Health embraced the national holiday by encouraging patients to send thanks to their providers with a selection of online thank you cards. Signature Medical Group posted a patient testimonial video on their Facebook page.

Today, patients can thank their physicians any day of the year with a positive online review. As concerned as doctors can be about reviews, the fact is most of them are positive. Our recent blog post on physician engagement makes this point:

“When we started really digging into this and showing our providers what the solution would look like, we found thousands of wonderful comments about providers in the Press Ganey surveys that never saw the light of day,” explained Karina Jennings, AVP of Marketing at Providence Health & Services. “It was really exciting for us to start putting these out into the public to show how great and well-respected the providers are.”

“Soliciting patient feedback really highlights the good work our physicians do on a daily basis,” according to Chris Turnbull, MSc, public relations manager at Carilion Clinic.

Show your doctors that they’re appreciated: share their great patient reviews with them.

About the Author

Sabrina Egan
Engagement Manager

Sabrina helps healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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March 28, 2017

Three Effective Practices for Physician Engagement

By: Zargham Ghani

“I got a bad review on ZocDoc… can you fix that?” We often hear from skeptical physicians who are concerned about online ratings or reviews. They’re uneasy how one unhappy patient may impact the entire practice, the actual validity of online reviews, and what value they offer to consumers, patients and families. A recent article on…

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“I got a bad review on ZocDoc… can you fix that?”

We often hear from skeptical physicians who are concerned about online ratings or reviews. They’re uneasy how one unhappy patient may impact the entire practice, the actual validity of online reviews, and what value they offer to consumers, patients and families. A recent article on PatientEngagementHIT.com reported, “Seventy-eight percent of providers say that online physician reviews cause them stress, despite the fact that about a half of patients think the reviews are useful,” according to a recent study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

The study went on to describe how “online physician reviews are becoming an increasingly widespread measure of patient satisfaction,” so despite the initial discomfort to some physicians, their value is undeniable in healthcare. The most successful online reputation management programs all have an important factor in common: strong physician engagement. Here are three effective strategies from our clients for engaging your physicians:

1. Communicate. Communicate. Communicate.

Proactive and consistent communication to all physicians from the outset can help allay concerns and drive engagement. Highlighting the program’s value and how it works, as well as educating them on reviews and how physicians can play an active role in their own reviews will help advance your cause. Sharing a case study on how a healthcare organization successfully managed their program can provide needed validation.

When Providence Health and Services (PH&S) initiated their transparency program, they knew communications was vital. 100 percent physician participation —no opt-outs allowed — was critical to the success of the program. Anticipating that physicians would express concerns about patient comments being posted online, they held forums to let doctors ask questions.

The fact is, most reviews are positive. Your physicians need to know this. “Soliciting patient feedback really highlights the good work our physicians do on a daily basis,” according to Chris Turnbull, MSc, public relations manager at Carilion Clinic in a recent blog post. 92 percent of their patients have a very positive encounter with their physicians.

2. Docs Love Data and Data Empowers Change

Doctors are overachievers and competitive by nature. They’re taught to rely on empirical evidence, data and outcomes. As I mentioned, physicians can be skeptical of online reviews; some aren’t aware of any patient experience issues. This is when patient experience metrics become an eye opener.

These metrics not only identify where doctors need to improve – they incentivize them to make changes for the better. Sharing reports that rank physicians within the practices can spark their competitive side – nobody wants to be at the bottom of the reviews page with the lowest score. You may have a brilliant orthopedic doctor, but suppose he or she doesn’t score well in physician communications. At Kure Pain Management, a very talented physician went from lowest scoring to top scoring doctor at the practice by implementing personal changes based on findings in the patient experience report he received.

Patient experience data isn’t just a game changer – it’s a behavior changer.

3. Encourage Your Physicians to Participate in the Review Process

For transparency initiatives, we recommend internally sharing survey feedback with providers before starting the initiative. Providers often learn that they have much better scores and comments from the survey data. It’s a motivating factor for them to have this information posted on their provider webpages. “When we started really digging into this and showing our providers what the solution would look like, we found thousands of wonderful comments about providers in the Press Ganey surveys that never saw the light of day,” explained Karina Jennings, AVP of Marketing at PH&S. “It was really exciting for us to start putting these out into the public to show how great and well-respected the providers are.”

To give physicians a more hands-on approach of previewing their comments, we recommend implementing an internal “soft launch”. Providers get access to the solution at a read-only level to see what patients are saying about their care, helping them become more engaged in the process. In addition, developing an internal review committee for the program is important for ensuring providers that patient comments will be vetted for publishing online. We suggest creating guidelines that allow physicians to appeal comments to the committee based on their validity. This gives physicians a voice in the process.

About the Author

Zargham Ghani
Engagement Manager

Zargham help healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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